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"In the ensuing few months there hasn’t been much to go on in terms of new hints of what it might look like."

I read this sentence in an online article and interpreted it as "there hasn't been much activity regarding xyz" but shouldn't it have been written as "hasn't been much gone on" instead? Although I admit, that sounds weird - what is the correct grammar of "to go on" ?

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    Your interpretation isn’t right. “There hasn’t been much to go on” means that there hasn’t been much (in terms of new hints) to base guesses and conclusions on. To go on X (stress on go, not on on) means to use X as a basis for something further; for example, if someone sets you a difficult task and you have only very little material to work with as your basis, you can say, “I’ll do my best, but I don’t have much to go on, so it will be difficult”. Commented Jul 14, 2014 at 10:09
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    I think you're mixing this up with there hasn't been much going on...
    – Mou某
    Commented Jul 14, 2014 at 10:10

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I think you read the sentence as if it said:

"In the ensuing few months there hasn't been much going on in terms of new hints of what it might look like."

However, that is not what the sentence actually says.

There hasn't been much to go on is idiomatic and means as much as:

There have not been many hints about what it might look like.

If someone says "I don't have much to go on", it means "I do not have a lot I can use to do something".

I should make the design, but I don't have much to go on.
I was asked to make a forecast for the next quarter, but I don't have much to go on.

The first sentence says I am probably waiting for input before I can make the design. The second one means that I am probably missing the relevant statistics that I need to make a forecast.

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