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I'm filling a resume and i want to say that I am good in word,excel and powerpoint. is saying "dominant in microsoft office" or " dominant in microsoft word and excel" correct?

closed as off-topic by tchrist, oerkelens, aedia λ, TimLymington, choster Jul 9 '14 at 15:42

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  • Use proficient as suggested. Don't mention the whole of MS Office if you only know your way around those three parts of it; the office suite also contains Outlook, OneNote, Access and more. Also, don't boast about being very good in it unless you actually are able to use the power-user functions such as, programming in the underlying VBa, connecting the different parts of the suite with external (data) sources and creating actual applications based on the existing software... If you can write a letter, create a spreadsheet and make a presentation, proficient is the word :) – oerkelens Jul 9 '14 at 12:57
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The correct word would be proficient. Dominant would mean that you're more powerful than other people, or that you are influential in its design.

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if you are really excellent, you can use proficient. If not that much, you can use familiar with or aware of

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The both sentences making sense that you are commanding/ruling the application of MS office so better you can prefer "I'm quite capable of using MS office".

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