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Is this grammatically incorrect or just clunky?

If you put time into it you will be rewarded as you master all the different techniques.


EDIT (copied from a reply below):

I’ll add a bit of context. What I’m trying to say is that as one puts time into any given activity, they’ll be emotionally rewarded as they master different aspects of it.

  • 2
    To me, it is neither grammatically incorrect nor even particularly awkward. It is perhaps a bit clunky, but not very much so. More importantly, I can't think of a better and less clunky way of phrasing it without changing the meaning. Perhaps adding in ‘start to’ makes it clearer, and you could change the conditional to an imperative-conditional and vary the vocabulary a bit: “Invest some time in it and you'll be (or find yourself) rewarded as you start to master the different techniques”. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jul 4 '14 at 20:24
  • As stated in the question as of 4 July, it's missing a comma after "it", and it might be useful to add the presently implied "then". I think it also flows better without the "all", but that's a matter of personal opinion on my part. So, "If you put time into it, then you will be rewarded as you master the different techniques". – brasshat Jul 4 '14 at 22:12
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I am by no means an English scholar but I do speak English, and it does not sound very correct. I would say it should be,

If you put the time in, you will prove that you can master all the different techniques.

As I mentioned, I’m no English scholar, so you should take what I say with a pinch of salt. It would also be helpful to have some context such as which situation this has or is going to be used in.

  • Thanks! I'll add a bit of context. What I'm trying to say is that as one puts time into any given activity, they'll be emotionally rewarded as they master different aspects of it. Does it still not make sense? – user83048 Jul 4 '14 at 19:45
  • Right. It is ungrammatical, and this is one way to fix it. Another is to use a reflexive pronoun instead of repeating the personal you: "If you put time into yourself". But then you'd hafta repeat the subject you, because yourself is the object of into -- i.e, If you put time into yourself, you will be rewarded Plus, of course, that might not be what you intend to say. – John Lawler Jul 4 '14 at 19:46
  • Sorry, I didn't see the missing it. That was a typo on my part. I think that should fix the question. – user83048 Jul 4 '14 at 19:56
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If you put time into it you will be rewarded with mastering all the different techniques.

  • This answer only works if mastering all the different techniques is, in and of itself, always a reward. I don't think this is the case in all circumstances. – brasshat Aug 9 '14 at 5:10

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