5

Is there one word for "hiding an obvious fact". For e.g.

I will not be __ about the fact that this task is difficult.

Some words that come to my mind are "deny" or "pretend", but they don't necessarily imply that there is something obvious about the thing being denied.

For e.g.

I will not deny the fact that this task is difficult (doesn't imply that the task is obviously difficult)

Another example -

She kept mum about her affair with him, but it was obvious to everyone.

She was __ about her affair with him.

3

I will not "gloss over" the fact that this task is difficult.

Though I would not want to miss an opportunity to use @FumbleFingers' "obfuscating", people frequently refer to the behavior of omitting discussion of an obvious or uncomfortable topic or detail by admitting to "glossing over" those specific issues.

Definition of "gloss over" from the Cambridge Dictionaries Online:

"to avoid considering something, such as an embarrassing mistake , to make it seem not important, and to quickly continue talking about something else"

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3

For both of your example sentences, discreet was the first word I thought of. I feel it implies that although a thing may be public knowledge, you are not the type to talk about it.

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1

Turn a blind eye is an apt phrase.

turn a blind eye (to someone or something) Fig. to ignore something and pretend you do not see it. The usher turned a blind eye to the little boy who sneaked into the theater. How can you turn a blind eye to all those starving children?

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/turn+a+blind+eye

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0

An adjective that, I think, may fit your sentences : ingenuous:

naive, artless, or innocent.

  • I will not be ingenuous about the fact that the task is difficult.

  • She was ingenuous about her affair with him.

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0

Per @ermanen's comment, probably the most common idiomatic usage for ignoring or denying something obvious is [not mentioning the] elephant in the room.

If that's considered too "informal" in some contexts, OP might consider...

"She was obfuscating about her affair"
(She was evasive, making information about the affair obscure, unclear, unintelligible)

...but I don't think that (or any other alternatives) would convey any sense that the topic being avoided was particularly obvious (except insofar as you wouldn't bother being "evasive" about something which wasn't already known - you simply wouldn't bring it up in the first place).

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0

I would state it this way:

I will be transparent about the fact that this task is difficult.

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