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I am translating the following text from English to Italian and it is not very clear for me the meanig of the phrase written in bold. Can somebody help me? Thank you in advance.

Twitter is an exceptionally successful platform for many people who are marketing a product or service, but it does require that you build slowly, over time, and connect only with people who are involved in or buying from your industry already. This guaranteed engagement, and because the platform is free, it makes perfect sense.

closed as off-topic by Yoichi Oishi Jun 27 '14 at 22:46

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    It's not a phrase; it's a compound/complex sentence. And in the context of the paragraph, it should be This guarantees engagement (present tense), instead of This guaranteed engagement (past tense). The writer is probly referring to the early history of Twitter, but is doing so in the present tense. That one past tense clause is out of place, and a distraction. What the bold text means is "this guarantees that there will be engagement (of individual people), and -- because the platform is free (= no charge), using it makes perfect sense." As you can see, liberties have been taken. – John Lawler Jun 27 '14 at 19:37
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    It may even be a simple typo since S and D are adjacent on a standard QWERTY keyboard. – Andrew Leach Jun 27 '14 at 20:14
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In a non-searchable and potentially ephemeral comment to the original posting, Professor Lawler kindly presented the following answer:

It’s not a phrase; it’s a compound/complex sentence. And in the context of the paragraph, it should be This guarantees engagement (present tense), instead of This guaranteed engagement (past tense).

The writer is probly referring to the early history of Twitter, but is doing so in the present tense. That one past tense clause is out of place, and a distraction.

What the bold text means is “this guarantees that there will be engagement (of individual people), and — because the platform is free (= no charge), using it makes perfect sense.”

As you can see, liberties have been taken.

I’ve marked this posting Community Wiki because it is John’s answer not my own, and so I deserve no reputation from it.

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