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I want to combine "A helps B to Verb1." and "A helps C to Verb2." into one sentence.

However, "A helps B Verb1." and "A helps C Verb2." are also correct sentences. ("to" can be omitted.)

So, my question is: Are there any incorrect sentences among the following?

  1. "A helps B to Verb1 and helps C to Verb2."
  2. "A helps B to Verb1 and C to Verb2."
  3. "A helps B Verb1 and C Verb2."

Here are examples.

  1. This test will help students to find their talents and it will help their parents to understand them.
  2. This test will help students to find their talents and their parents to understand them.
  3. This test will help students find their talents and their parents understand them.
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    A helps B and C to (verb1) and (verb2) respectively. is what you mean? – Kris Jun 19 '14 at 9:10
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    I think #3 can be tricky. But 1 and 2 are fine. – anongoodnurse Jun 19 '14 at 9:11
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    All three are workable alternatives and appear, prima facia, grammatical. – Kris Jun 19 '14 at 9:11
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    The parallel structure is fine in each case, though in each I'm not sure if the final them means the students or their talents. – Jon Hanna Jun 19 '14 at 11:01
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    All three are definitely grammatical, but them in each case is a bit ambiguous – Araucaria - Not here any more. Jun 19 '14 at 11:33
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All three sentences seem to me indistinguishable from sentences a native speaker of English would make.

There is some ambiguity in some of them, but ambiguity is a reality of human speech, and the people telling you you're wrong because your sentences can be interpreted in more than one way may not know what they're talking about.

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This test will help students to find their talents and it will help their parents to understand them.

The test creates this reaction... The students find their own talents, the parents understand either the students or the talents.. I'm not sure which.

This test will help students to find their talents and their parents to understand them.

Same as above, though now I am more inclined to believe that 'them' refers to talents, only due to it being the last plural.

This test will help students find their talents and their parents understand them.

Here you are affirming that the parents already understand their children/talents or even the reasons of the text.

All of these example are too ambiguous, so I'd choose different connectors to clarify your meanings (unless it's for marketing) for example...

This test will help students find their talents, xxxxx their parents understand those talents.

Xxxxx - helping / this in turn will help / thus helping

Hope this helps!

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As the comments by Jon Hanna and Araucaria (above) indicate, the three examples you give are not faulty as a matter of parallelism or grammar. But the example sentences you provide don't consist only of "A helps B to Verb1 and helps C to Verb2," "A helps B to Verb1 and C to Verb2," and "A helps B Verb1 and C Verb2." Rather, because the verbs involved are transitive, they introduce direct objects of both Verb1 and Verb2:

  1. "A helps B to TransitiveVerb1 ObjectC and helps D to TransitiveVerb2 ObjectE."

  2. "A helps B to TransitiveVerb1 ObjectC and D to TransitiveVerb2 ObjectE."

  3. "A helps B TransitiveVerb1 ObjectC and D TransitiveVerb2 ObjectE."

where ObjectC and ObjectE are the objects of TransitiveVerb1 and TransitiveVerb2, respectively. Unfortunately, these additions to the logic of each sentence complicate the task of associating the parts properly, especially at the "ObjectC and D" point of the second and third sentences.

At the very last, I would add a comma after ObjectC in the second and third sentences, to indicate a break where the break from one parallel branch to the other occurs. Even then, I think the first sentence of the three is clearer than the other two.

And finally, for reasons that probably have more to do with idiomatic patterns of usage (or perhaps personal idiosyncrasy) than anything else, I would use a fourth structure, instead of any of the three you offer—namely,

  1. "A helps B TransitiveVerb1 ObjectC and helps D TransitiveVerb2 ObjectE."

(omitting to twice), which in your original example would translate into this sentence:

"This test will help students find their talents and will help their parents understand those talents."

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