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The Enlightenment was a cultural movement of intellectuals (Europe, XVIII century). It is associated with the Scientific Revolution, the Atlantic Revolutions (American Revolution, French Revolution, Latin American Revolutions, etc.), Romanticism, most of modern Political Science and Jurisprudence, and a lot more.

1) Is "Illuminism" an acceptable synonym?

2) Is "illuminist" the attribute (for both people and ideas)? Would an "illuminist idea" be the same as an "Enlightenment idea"? Would an "illuminist" be the same as an "Enlightenment thinker/intellectual"?

3) If not, is there any alternative to the attributive "Enlightenment"?

4) Is "Enlightened" an acceptable adjective for the attributive "Enlightenment"? In this case how do you avoid confusion with the adjective "enlightened" just meaning "wise"?

5) A single-word adjective for "Enlightenment intellectual", "intellectual who is a follower of the Enlightenment"?

  • Illuminism "A psychotic state of exaltation in which one has delusions and hallucinations of communion with supernatural or exalted beings." – Third News Jun 18 '14 at 4:46
  • I think this is a general reference question. – user66974 Jun 18 '14 at 4:49
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Enlightenment thinkers opposed superstition. … John Locke was one of the most influential Enlightenment thinkers. He influenced other thinkers such as Rousseau and Voltaire, among others.

A Short History of Modern Philosophy

In the first flush of scientific confidence, the thinkers of the Enlightenment tried to carry over into every human intellectual endeavour the search for first principles which, in Newton's physics, had been attended with such success.

Enlightenment, always with an initial uppercase letter.

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Zeitgeist

(spirit of the age or spirit of the time) is the intellectual fashion or dominant school of thought that typifies and influences the culture of a particular period in time. For example, the Zeitgeist of modernism typified and influenced architecture, art, and fashion during much of the 20th century

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