1

Given this sentence:

Its original manufacturer’s warranty, if any, still applies, with warranty details included in the item details.

Can I change “if any” in the above sentence to “if existing”?

Its original manufacturer’s warranty, if existing, still applies, with warranty details included in the item details

2

You could, in this sentence, without changing the meaning in any substantial way. I would not recommend doing so, however, as "if any" flows better, while "if existing" sounds stilted. There will be other sentences in which such a substitution would change the meaning, however.

  • what "stilted" means? like not elegant? – Kiti Jun 17 '14 at 13:58
  • so "if any" means "if there is any warranty"? – Kiti Jun 17 '14 at 14:00
  • Stilted means awkwardly formal or precise. And yes, "if any" means "if there is any warranty" in this context. – outis nihil Jun 17 '14 at 14:02
  • 1
    Someone want to explain why they voted this answer down? – outis nihil Jun 17 '14 at 14:17

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