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Background:

I'm writing a professional (technical) report in which I want to express the following in one simple sentence: The whole report is written based on a certain assumption, except one part that's based on a different assumption. (Let's say a battery has 10 Volts in parts of the report, and 12 Volts in another part). This means that one part of the report is "wrong". I want to express that the way I'm doing this has been "approved" by our client. The part in parentheses is just to illustrate the context.

(In most of the report 10V has been used. However, the voltage is actually 12V. 12V has been used in chapter 2 only.)

The usage of a different voltage in chapter xxx only, is done in agreement with client name.

However, the last part of that sentence doesn't seem good to me. I think it's grammatically correct, but not something a native English speaking person would write. Can I say / write: "... is done in agreement with"?

  • But "keeping the rest of the report unchanged" is different from "the usage of a different voltage". – Andrew Leach Jun 16 '14 at 11:49
  • @Andrew I guess this is a website where I should not change the context much when explaining stuff =P It's supposed to look like it's written at the same time, not as bits and pieces. Therefore, even though one part of it is actually an update, I won't write that explicitly. But, I do have to explain why there is a difference. More to the point: "In most of the report 10V has been used. However, the voltage is actually 12V. 12V has been used in chapter 2 only. The use of a different voltage is in agreement with xx." (This is not exactly what I've written but the meaning is about the same.) – Chelsea G. Jun 16 '14 at 12:05
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What you currently have boils down to The usage is done. Usages generally aren't done, but they can be agreed upon.

The usage of a different voltage in chapter x only has been agreed with the client.

I wouldn't use a comma to separate "The usage" from "has been agreed". You could also lose only as that can be inferred from the context.

The distinction between usage and use might be commented upon.

usage
The way in which a word or phrase is normally and correctly used
Habitual or customary practice, especially as creating a right, obligation, or standard

use
The action of using something or the state of being used for a purpose

[Both ODO]

Usage is about the way something is used; use merely means that it has been used (this is evident in the title "English Language & Usage"). I would write the sentence as

The use of a different voltage in chapter x has been agreed with the client.

  • Thanks Andrew =) To me, it feels like something is missing here: "The use [...] has been agreed with the client", but I guess that's the reason why I asked this question in the first place. I can't really tell what's correct and what's not. =) – Chelsea G. Jun 16 '14 at 11:29
  • The point is that done does not go with the noun use: "I did this use," for example. Uses aren't "done". Using "The use has been agreed" is missing something which narrows down what you're talking about; normally one would say "The use of x has been agreed", but it could be "This use has been agreed." You could say "The usage has been agreed," because usage is more abstract than use, as I explain in the answer -- but usage isn't the right word here: you need use, which means you need use of. – Andrew Leach Jun 16 '14 at 11:40
  • As a native American speaker, "has been agreed with" sounds awkward to me. Maybe it is missing a preposition (agreed upon/agreed to)? I would reword the whole thing to "The client has agreed to the use of a different voltage in chapter X". Or "The client has agreed to the use of the incorrect voltage in all chapters except X". – Andrea Jun 16 '14 at 13:08
  • @Andrea AmE seems to love its additional prepositions (eg meet with). BrE tends not to use them. If it's to be used in an AmE context, then some adjustment may be needed. – Andrew Leach Jun 16 '14 at 13:11
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"... in agreement with [client]" - works

"... after agreement from [client]" - same idea, but stronger focus on the need of this agreement.

"... after consulting with [client]" - less focus on need for agreement.

"... have been cleared with [client]" - also has focus on the need for input from client.

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I can't speak for all native speakers but I'd write "is done with the consent of xxx". consent or

  • This works for me, although I think "approval" may be better as it implies more positive agreement from the client. But both "consent" and "approval" imply that the change came from the OP and the client was just asked if it was acceptable. "Agreement" may be the best word, as it is more positive about the client's involvement. The bit I think is clumsy is the "is done with", I'd probably just put "The use of a different voltage in chapter xxx was agreed with xxx". (edited because Andrew Leach is right about "use" vs "usage") – Rupe Jun 16 '14 at 11:17
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The usual word for the purpose in the OP's context is concurrence, an agreement in opinion.

concurrence

  1. Agreement in opinion.
  2. Cooperation, as of agents, circumstances, or events.

    "Stuart and Clarke felt highly displeased at his taking so precipitate a step, without waiting for their concurrence, … "
    (Washington Irving, Astoria or Anecdotes of an enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains)

Whence,

The usage of a different voltage in chapter xxx only, is done in concurrence with xxx.

Better still,

The usage of a different voltage in chapter xxx only, is done with the concurrence of xxx.

As in

But in court-annexed mediation and in concurrence with the parties, we add a rider that the compromise agreements are “not contrary to law… public policies and public order.
(Benedicto Q Sánchez on Sunstar, May 26, 2014)

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I'd go for

With the permission of X, chapter Y...

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Consider also:

The use of a different voltage in chapter 5, is in accordance with xxx

The only is unneeded as there is only one chapter number given in context.

  • +1 for use rather than usage, though I think 'by agreement with the client' would better reflect what OP is trying to say. – TimLymington Jun 16 '14 at 11:49
  • @TimLymington I was angling for the use of accordance as 'in a manner conforming [with] (the wishes of)'. I agree that your phrasing is also robust. – Sam Jun 16 '14 at 11:50

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