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In the sentence: At the beginning of the play, the entire cast dances maniacally across the stage. What kind of phrase is [manically across the stage]? Is it an adverb phrase, prepositional phrase or (as some of my schoolmates think) a noun phrase? Thank you very much for any help.

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    It is not one phrase but two, both playing adverbial roles: "The cast dances [in this manner] [at this location]." Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 15:26
  • @StoneyB you might as well put that in as an answer. I doubt anyone has much more to say on the matter, and whether they do or not, that does answer the question adequately.
    – Jon Hanna
    Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 15:40
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    I think this question is a bit basic for ELU, so I've closevoted as General Reference. Offhand the only way I can think of to use a noun (phrase) after a verb like dance is something along the lines of "Nijinsky danced Swan Lake" Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 16:02
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    @FumbleFingers can you think of a general reference that would aid answering this question? I think it would be reasonable to comment with a helpful link in this case because I can't think just how I'd google for it myself.
    – Jon Hanna
    Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 16:22
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    @Jon: Yeah, well my comment was by way of explanation to OP of why I was closevoting (I was too lazy to bother adding my customary "should be on ELL" advice). If OP had gone to the trouble of signing up with an actual name, I probably would have added the advice and flagged the question to ask if the mods would consider migrating it to ELL (where I'd be more than happy to see questions like this). Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 17:54

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It is not one phrase but two, both playing adverbial roles:

The cast dances [in this manner] [at this location].

Maniacally is an adverb; across the stage is a preposition phrase.

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    Likewise, manically and maniacally are not one word but two. Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 16:24

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