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I have several fragments:

  1. Samsung 32-bit RISC ARM 1176JZ(F)-S v1.0
  2. a processor code developed by Samsung
  3. the processor code uses ARM 1176JZ(F)-S v1.0 core
  4. ARM 1176JZ(F)-S v1.0 core is based on ARMv6Z architecture
  5. ARMv6Z architecture belongs to ARM11 family
  6. ARM11 family is a family of ARM architecture 32-bit Reduced instruction set computing (RISC) microprocessor cores

I want to join them all into a single sentence:

Samsung 32-bit RISC ARM 1176JZ(F)-S v1.0 is a processor code developed by Samsung that uses ARM 1176JZ(F)-S v1.0 core which is based on ARMv6Z architecture which belongs to ARM11 family which is a family of ARM architecture 32-bit Reduced instruction set computing (RISC) microprocessor cores

Is it okay to have a series of whichs after a chain of interrelated nouns?

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    Sure - or thats. "This is the farmer sowing his corn That kept the cock that crowed in the morn That waked the priest all shaven and shorn That married the man all tattered and torn That kissed the maiden all forlorn That milked the cow with the crumpled horn That tossed the dog that worried the cat That killed the rat that ate the malt That lay in the house that Jack built!" Whether it's a good practice to build a sentence that way is another question. Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 13:49
  • where did u get that long sentence
    – Kiti
    Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 13:51
  • It's an old nursery rhyme that builds through incremental repetition: "This is the house that Jack built." "This is the malt that lay in the house that Jack built." "This the rat that ate the malt that lay in the house that Jack built." And so forth. Commented Jun 11, 2014 at 13:53

1 Answer 1

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Grammatically, it is correct to do this, but it depends on your intention whether or not it's appropriate.

If it is important for the user to read and understand each part of the series, don't use a series of "which"s. The information all bleeds together, putting responsibility on the user to sort out what part is relevant.

If it is not important, for example if this is just background information in a textbook or user manual, then the "which" series reduces the space required while still providing all of the information.

I've worked on a number of technical manuals, and this is as close to an "industry standard" as I've ever found.

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