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I am a bit confused with using the phrase state of the art. Is the following usage correct?

My motivation relies on the fact, discussed above, that there is little global state of the art evaluation of this product.

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Janus Bahs Jacquet, Kristina Lopez, tchrist, user66974 Jun 6 '14 at 20:21

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  • I don't see why this was closed. The questioner did identify a specific source of concern in the text (i.e., the appropriateness of the term "state of the art"). – phenry Jun 9 '14 at 16:01
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This usage appears incorrect. The product may be state of the art (or not), the evaluation cannot be described as little-global or state of the art.

I think you meant,

My motivation relies on the fact, discussed above, that there has been limited evaluation of this state of the art product.

  • evaluation can be state of the art? if the product is new – sacvf Jun 6 '14 at 14:00
  • @sacvf Context is key; if you're describing a new method of evaluation then maybe. The product being evaluated is then immaterial (except as a point of comparison with other evaluation methods). How is the age of the product relevant for the evaluation of the product? – Elliott Frisch Jun 6 '14 at 14:34
  • @sacvf What is the question? Evaluate is a verb. – Elliott Frisch Jun 6 '14 at 14:45
  • I do not understand what you meant? – sacvf Jun 6 '14 at 14:48
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If you are referring to the evaluation being state-of-the-art, it would help to surround the article with a little disambiguation.

My motivation relies on the fact, discussed above, that of the evaluations conducted of this product, few can be considered state-of-the-art.

I would just say 'recent', though.

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