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There is no point in pretending that XXX is what it is not, nor that it is not what it is.

I feel that English language has many of these kind of usage that exploits the fact that the logically flipped clauses put side-by-side strikes emphasis of the point the writer want to make. What named rhetoric method is this?

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A fairly-general term is chiasmus. The wikipedia article about it says:

In rhetoric, chiasmus (from the Greek χιάζω, chiázō, "to shape like the letter Χ") is the figure of speech in which two or more clauses are related to each other through a reversal of structures in order to make a larger point; that is, the clauses display inverted parallelism.
Today, chiasmus is applied fairly broadly to any "criss-cross" structure, although in classical rhetoric it was distinguished from other similar devices, such as the antimetabole.

Antimetabole is a less-general term that may be a better fit. It refers to

repetition of words in successive clauses, but in transposed order (e.g., "I know what I like, and I like what I know"). It is similar to chiasmus although chiasmus does not use repetition of the same words or phrases.

Note, reversing the order of clauses in the example will, doubtless, make it better; ie, write

There is no point in pretending that XXX is not what it is, nor that it is what it is not.

instead of

There is no point in pretending that XXX is what it is not, nor that it is not what it is.

The original version on the one hand reads clumsily and on the other rather trails off at the end, while the reversed version can read well and ends emphatically.

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