2

I would typically write a bullet point list that is all part of one sentence with:

  • no capitals
  • no punctuation at the end of each point
  • a grammatical structure that is consistent
  • a full-stop after the terminal point.

However, I've come across situations where the list is an 'or' list, instead of an 'and' one.

For example, when writing such a list, I would not use:

  • capitals
  • end-line punctuation [OR]
  • incorrect grammatical structure.

How and where should I structure it so the 'or' is apparent? The 'and' is usually implied in such a list, but without punctuation at the end of each line, the 'or' can get lost.

Thoughts? Thanks!

  • That’s not correct. Either all items must have a full stop at the end of each, or none of them can. – tchrist Jun 12 '14 at 13:39
  • Can you point to a source for that? This was something I was taught by an editing qualification and most internet sources indicate the same. – Mrs Grumbley Jun 19 '14 at 2:23
1

In my opinion as a reader, the 'or' is implied too.

This is how I read your question:

When writing such a list, I would not use:

  • capitals [OR]
  • end-line punctuation [OR]
  • incorrect grammatical structure.

As soon as the 'not' appears, the 'or' is implied after every bullet point. That is why it is uncommon to specifically write 'or' with the penultimate point.

-1

Try:

For example, when writing such a list, I would not use:

  • capitals
  • end-of-line punctuation

or

  • incorrect grammatical structure.

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