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At one point while browsing the internet I came across an article that had wonderful adjectives for the different types of pride one can feel. Unfortunately I didn't bookmark it, and I can't find it! Examples of what I mean:

  • The pride you feel when one of your students does well vs.
  • The pride you feel when you create something wonderful vs.
  • The pride you feel when an opponent stumbles

There are subtle differences between each one.

I'm wondering - does someone know if there is a reference for these terms? I thought it was wonderful that there was actually a distinction in the types of pride one can feel.

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    I would not use pride for the feeling after an opponent's stumble, unless that stumble were specifically related to something you did that demonstrated your superiority in avoiding the stumble, which is captured by your sense #2. – choster May 28 '14 at 18:25
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    Not to mention the pride that is made of lions. – Janus Bahs Jacquet May 28 '14 at 19:43
  • Pride in someones defeat confuses me too but there is a term for the pleasure in another's failure – Third News May 29 '14 at 1:07
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Here's my stab at it.

The pride you feel when one of your students does well:

prestige, distinction

The pride you feel when you create something wonderful:

self-respect, perhaps hubris (although hubris means excessive pride)

The pride you feel when an opponent stumbles:

superiority

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If your opponent makes a mistake and helps you advance, pride would be an inappropriate description because you did nothing to earn that pride.

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Urbacity: An extreme or exaggerated pride in ones city

Surquedry Overweening pride; arrogance; presumption; insolence. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

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  • The pride you feel when one of your students does well: I'd call that "sympathetic or vicarious".
  • The pride you feel when you create something wonderful: possibly "accomplishment", or (like hubris) possibly "arrogance or conceit"
  • The pride you feel when an opponent stumbles: I'd call that "hauteur or arrogance", or possibly schadenfreude (both hauteur and schadenfreude are loanwords used in English).

protected by tchrist Mar 19 '17 at 20:51

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