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This sentence popped up as correct on a website:

"Even though I enjoyed myself at the expensive dinner and most of my friends were in town to see me, I left."

I'm no grammarian, so I turn to you all for help. Shouldn't there be a comma before and?

"Even though I enjoyed myself at the expensive dinner**,** and most of my friends were in town to see me, I left."

I assume that since "and most of my friends were in town to see me" is an independent clause, it should have a comma at the beginning.

I'm a grammarphobe. Please answer correctly, but gently.

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    Either is acceptable, I believe. Nevertheless, I recommend omitting the comma. In this case, your sentence is short for Even though I enjoyed myself at the expensive dinner and even though most of my friends were in town to see me, I left. Considering that putting a comma before and cuts that clause off from the even though on which it depends, I advise not using it. – Anonym May 27 '14 at 3:04
  • They have two different meanings. – F.E. May 27 '14 at 5:53
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"Most of my friends were in town to see me" looks like an independent clause at first glance, but it's actually a subordinate clause of "I left." Since both are related to "even though," I would leave out the comma.

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