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In this context:

trying to become a staple amongst the community

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    Can you provide more context? – Callithumpian Mar 21 '11 at 21:58
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    it's in response to this answer english.stackexchange.com/questions/17240/…. In this context, "staple" means "a default need; a basic necessity", and "community" means "the target audience for this product". – tenfour Mar 21 '11 at 22:09
  • So it is a thing, not a person. Might want to rephrase to state who is trying to make it a staple. – Kelly Hess Mar 21 '11 at 22:17
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Something that has become both common and expected in the same sense that bread and milk are staple foods:

a necessary commodity for which demand is constant

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    +1; Synonyms for this context could be "a pillar of the community." – MrHen Mar 21 '11 at 21:53
  • Thanks. I was hoping the "trying" part was just a bad word choice and the quote wasn't referring to a person. I'm not sure I want to know in what sense a person can become a staple amongst a community. :) – Kelly Hess Mar 21 '11 at 21:58
  • Strangely, I have heard the phrase before now. I couldn't possibly remember where but I recognized it immediately. It does seem odd given the traditional use of "staple," but I've seen stranger things. :) – MrHen Mar 21 '11 at 22:01
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It's not a very good word choice. "Staple" is most commonly associated with basic foodstuffs. Flour, oil, and eggs are all "staples".

The meaning of the word has stretched somewhat, so anything that is considered to be necessary, central, or key can be described as a staple, but the food connotation usually restricts the usage.

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  • I hear "staple of the community" now and again. The phrase isn't completely new. – MrHen Mar 21 '11 at 21:59
  • Yes, sometimes I too hear things that are wrong. – z7sg Ѫ Mar 21 '11 at 22:32
  • @mrhen: Sure, but it's usually applied to institutions, not to people. People are Pillars of the community. – Satanicpuppy Mar 22 '11 at 3:21
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It is hard to tell without context, but I think maybe there is some confusion here between the concepts of "staple" foods, as outlined by Satanicpuppy and Kelly C Hess, and the phrase pillar of the community, which means a prominent and respected member of the community.

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This is metaphorical.

Being a "staple amongst the community" is a valuable attribute. This person is a pillar in the community. Some would also refer to the person as a rock. I just call them leaders, haha.

The word "amongst" is heard in British, Canadian, or Australian English. It is rarely heard in American English.

A "staple in your life" is a person, place, or thing holding your life together. Usually this is used when referring to person who is or has been a powerful influence in your life. My mother is a staple in my life. I can always count on her being there for me and holding things together.

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