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I wanted to use the word "cum" to avoid repeating "and" in the following phrase:

example.com is a teacher-cum-student search and listing site...

But on second thoughts, the word "cum" is also a vulgar slang, which certainly would raise a few eyebrows when readers come across it. Is there a good substitute for this word?

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    We appreciate when someone with a question shares their work. What did you find when you looked for synonyms for and or cum in the dictionary? You did do that, didn't you? May 24 '14 at 4:50
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    @medica, am I supposed to be Mr Obvious telling the world that "together, with, including, also, too, besides, furthermore, moreover, etc" are unsuitable synonyms before I can post a question? May 24 '14 at 5:16
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    Read the section (in help) on how to ask a good question. Yes, that is exactly what you're supposed to do, for two reasons. One is that you don't waste people's time when they suggest words you've already rejected. That's just polite and thoughtful. The second is that we are not a dictionary, and discourage people from using EL&U in that manner. Showing us that you actually have looked it up shows some willingness to accommodate the site's requests. May 24 '14 at 5:23
  • @medica, normally I would. But, in this case I personally find it too basic for anyone not to know. Anyway thanks for the clarification. May 24 '14 at 5:44
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    So example.com is a search and listing site for people who are both teachers and students? That's what the current phrasing says. Quite a narrow target group. May 24 '14 at 7:45
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I'm not sure X-cum-Y is a substitute for X and Y.

X-cum-Y means that the single entity A is both an X and a Y at the same time, X and Y suggests two entities A being an X and B being a Y, except for the likes of johnny-cum-lately which is not the same thing.

If anything I'd think that it's search and listing that you want to combine into a dual nature rather than the intended audience and in that case example.com is a teacher and student search/listing site might work.

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    "except for the likes of johnny-cum-lately which is not the same thing." Ain't that the truth! "Johnny-COME-lately" refers to someone who arrives late to a situation. May 24 '14 at 7:17
  • How about or instead of /? Is there any difference? May 24 '14 at 8:54
  • @QuestionOverflow I think or is a bit exclusive as in search or listing when you want it to mean both.
    – Frank
    May 24 '14 at 9:03
  • I think I get your first point after reading Janus's comment. Regarding or, I thought it is by default inclusive unless either is used? May 24 '14 at 9:39
  • @QuestionOverflow The clusivity of or has been discussed here. I suggested that in your case it seems a bit exclusive but that's only my view.
    – Frank
    May 24 '14 at 9:47
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It's utterly ridiculous to think of "cum" as the slang word.

"... the word 'cum' would raise a few eyebrows when readers come across it ..."

only if the readers are total morons.

So, in a "bevis and butthead" cartoon, that would happen. ("Heh heh .. he said 'cum' .. heh heh")

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  • LOL. If there aren't, why would my question title be edited, not once, but twice? May 24 '14 at 8:51
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    If someone edited your title, thinking of the vulgarity aspect - they are illiterate. BY all means with say very small children, one doesn't say for example "oilseed rape" you may prefer just "oilseed". But everyone here is over 8 years old, I imagine.
    – Fattie
    May 24 '14 at 9:05
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I think the best substitute for 'cum' is the simple forward slash:

teacher/student search and listing site.

However, you might also consider encouraging your readers to lift their minds out of the gutter by ignoring the salacious connotations of the word 'cum'.

Similarly, it seems a pity for everybody to have to stop allowing their consciences to prick them or refrain from cheering when someone cocks a snook at overbearing authority -- or for Dick's friends to be compelled to always call him Richard -- simply because they are all terrified of offending some self-styled Savonarola-in-a-suit.

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    Careful of the word 'slash'. It is an only slightly less offensive way of saying 'piss' in Britain. Polite people, when giving web addresses say 'stroke'.
    – WS2
    May 24 '14 at 8:37
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    Heh heh, he said 'stroke'
    – Fattie
    May 24 '14 at 8:48
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I have been in your shoes, and, yes, it makes you uneasy to use the "cum" word simply to mean "in addition to" when you are familiar with its vulgar aspect.

So, I often use the "plus" word, which essentially means "together with" or "in addition to".

I am a writer-plus-programmer.

But, to be honest, writer-cum-programmer sounds better.

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  • "plus" is actually a great suggestion. I don't like using "cum" or "Re" because it's so faux-intellectual to use latin. Great idea, Calypto.
    – Fattie
    May 24 '14 at 8:46
  • @JoeBlow Thanks. And, I didn't know about "Re"... good of you to mention it.
    – Calypto
    May 24 '14 at 9:02
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I would never worry about using a word which had a legitimate meaning.

'Cum' is simply the Latin for 'with'.

There are many villages in England which are named 'something cum somewhere', and they liberally appear on road-signs etc. It arises where two parishes, at some point in history, have been merged.

'Chorlton cum Hardy' is nowadays a well-known suburb of Manchester.

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Also you could use "extra", "in addition to", "also", "combined with". As in 'bedroom and study' or 'bedroom cum study'.

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