1

What is the origin of the culinary term or dish "escabeche"

  • 3
    Wikipedia says "The origin of the word escabeche is Persian, and was brought to Spain by the Arabs during the Moorish conquests. The word derives from al-sikbaj[...]" This does not seem unlikely, is there any reason why you expect this information to be wrong or incomplete? – oerkelens May 21 '14 at 13:07
  • Coo. Three responses all quoting Wikipedia. – Andrew Leach May 21 '14 at 13:09
  • @AndrewLeach And why not? – Kris May 21 '14 at 13:09
  • 3
    @Kris No reason, except that presumably the asker could have looked there too. – Andrew Leach May 21 '14 at 13:10
  • I find this Q&A particularly interesting in light of the fact that the only "escabeche" I've ever known has been the pickled carrots and onions served as condiments in Mexican restaurants. The "acid" or "vinegar" connection is there, but the dish is completely different from the original meaning of the word. – Kevin Krumwiede Jan 5 '16 at 3:57
2

Escabeche is from Persian al-sikbaj

The origin of the word escabeche is Persian, and was brought to Spain by the Arabs during the Moorish conquests. The word derives from al-sikbaj, the name of a popular meat dish cooked in a sweet and sour sauce, usually vinegar and honey or date molasses.

The LA Times blog Forklore: The roots of escabeche:

Sikbaj is a Persian word meaning "vinegar stew," and most medieval recipes describe it as lamb stewed with vinegar and spices.

This one makes for a good read.

And then, Ichthyology thinks:

The word is Spanish in origin or possible from the Farsi sikbag meaning acid food

0

"The origin of the word escabeche is Persian, and was brought to Spain by the Arabs during the Moorish conquests. The word derives from al-sikbaj, the name of a popular meat dish cooked in a sweet and sour sauce, usually vinegar and honey or date molasses."

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.