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Is there a word or phrase that covers all subjects of the basic educational subjects (i.e. math, reading, science, writing, history)? I know of the "Three Rs", but I'm looking for something more formal. Here's the context, if that helps:

To this day, many societies continue to believe that education should be based around _____.

  • ... the trivium? – 200_success May 19 '14 at 16:03
  • @ermanen Does the trivium and quadrivium middle-ages reference still apply? – Third News May 19 '14 at 16:10
  • @Third News: They are historical terms but can be mentioned as an extra information maybe. – ermanen May 19 '14 at 16:14
7

How about the phrase Core Curriculum?

"A core curriculum is a curriculum, or course of study, which is deemed central and usually made mandatory for all students of a school or school system."

Wikipedia: Curriculum#Core_curriculum

  • 1
    You may quote the explanation of core curriculum from here: Curriculum – ermanen May 19 '14 at 15:44
  • This is common where I'm from; "core classes" are the essential academic classes. Mathematics, sciences, English, and history. – user11550 May 19 '14 at 17:08
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    If you use the phrase Core Curriculum in the US, be aware that it may be assumed you are referring to the Common Core curriculum designed at the federal level, and which is somewhat controversial. Depending on context, this may not even be a possibility, but it's worth knowing it exists. – Karen May 20 '14 at 2:15
1

Academic Syllabus or simply Syllabus.

Usage-

To this day, many societies continue to believe that education should be based around academic syllabus.

Or

To this day, many societies continue to believe that education should be based around academic studies.

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To this day, many societies continue to believe that education should be based around the mastery of the fundamentals.

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Academia comes to mind - but it might be broader than you asked for.

  • 1
    This word is usually used to refer to the broader academic community rather than academic classes or even classes in general—I don't think it's suitable here. – user11550 May 19 '14 at 17:10

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