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Please explain how a stative verb and a dynamic verb can have the same subject without breaking parallel construction.

How correct and reasonable is this:

I travel around the world and enjoy flying, where travel is a dynamic verb and enjoy a stative verb?

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    (1) The term is Active verb, not "dynamic"; own is stative, while rent is active, and stative verbs can't be used in the progressive, for instance: *I am owning that house, vs I am renting that house. (2) There is no such thing as "breaking parallel construction". This is not a grammar term, but something a writing teacher made up, so pay no attention to it. English has no prohibition on active and stative verbs sharing subjects through Conjunction Reduction. – John Lawler May 10 '14 at 17:37
  • @JohnLawler: According to Wikipedia, dynamic verb is the main term and active verb is a synonym redirected to it. With the usual grain of salt with which to take Wikipedia, of course. – hippietrail Aug 31 '14 at 8:24
  • Perhaps a fan of CGEL edited it. Active/Stative has been the term in the English syntax literature since at least 1970. As we see daily here, any and every term is used in the English education literature, somewhere, at some time, by some writer, with some meaning. – John Lawler Aug 31 '14 at 15:50
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There are incongruous parallel constructions, but this is a result of incongruous concepts, not of whether or not one or both are stative:

active + active:

I travel around the world and visit all the well-known beauty spots. :-)

I travel around the world and visit all my neighbours. :-(

active + stative:

I travel around the world and own my own plane. :-)

I travel around the world and own my own hamster. :-(

stative + stative:

I have a diploma in cooking and own my own restaurant. :-)

I have a diploma in cooking and own my own hamster. :-(

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