16

I usually use "at a company" but I have encountered some articles using "in a company", "in XYZ firm" or "in an organization".

Which one is right?

  • 1
    "Works for XYZ" is what I hear most often. – Adam Mar 18 '11 at 15:38
33

Use:

I work in/at/for a company that makes microchips.

I work at/for Intel.

I work in/for Intel's accounting division. (in sounds more natural in this case)

There is virtually no difference in meaning, except that I would notice:

  • for tends to emphasize the relationship you have as an employee to your employer

  • in / at are more about the physical place (this is where you go to work every day)

  • 1
    +1 for actually explaining yourself more generally rather than just stating the specific answer. – Adam Mar 18 '11 at 15:43
7
  • I work at Avaya. — YEAH
  • I work for Avaya — YEAH
  • I'm with Avaya — YEAH
  • *I work in Avaya? — NOPE

Edit: "I work with Avaya" is more likely to mean you aren't an employee but may be an independent contractor of some kind.

Thanks @Robusto for the insights!

  • What the heck? Why the downvote! Oh God, Mercy! – n0nChun Mar 18 '11 at 10:34
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    "I work with Avaya" implies that you might work for another company which is working on a project with Avaya, rather than being an employee of Avaya. – Steve Melnikoff Mar 18 '11 at 13:35
  • You can still use it. I was just exhausting all the possibilities. – n0nChun Mar 18 '11 at 13:42
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    @n0nChun: Saying you work "with" a company is not the same as saying you work "for" or "at" that company. However, you can use "with" without the "working" to mean the same thing: "I'm with Avaya" means you work for Avaya. "I work with Avaya" is more likely to mean you aren't an employee but may be an independent contractor of some kind. – Robusto Mar 18 '11 at 14:32
  • @Robusto: Edited. – n0nChun Mar 18 '11 at 15:01

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