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I couldn't find this specific type of phrase on here yet. I'm especially not sure whether to use the plural in this phrase. Should I use your and your friends' -mind- or -minds-?

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  • Hmmmm. Yes, you should use the plural if multiple people's minds will be blown, but this phrasing is strained to an AmE ear. The problem with your phrasing is that blowing someone's mind is an informal or slang term, so it is very odd to be so specific about whose minds are getting blown. If you are talking to an individual, just say, "this will blow your mind". It is implied when he/she shares it with friends, they will equally experience some mind blowimg! If you are addressing one person in a group as part of a group, "blow your minds" will work.
    – Mike
    May 3 '14 at 20:06
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If you can restructure the phrasing consider "this will blow the minds of you and your friends."

Otherwise mind should still be plural even though each friend has only one because the object of the verb is plural (there are multiple minds).

This is supported with a quick google ngrams search which shows zero results in google books for "friends' mind" but relatively frequent usage of "friends' minds"

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  • Why "both of you" for "your?" "Your" can also imply one or more people.
    – Elian
    May 3 '14 at 17:00
  • Good point. Edited.
    – pavja2
    May 3 '14 at 17:06
  • By analogy with your construction "blow the minds of you and your friends," how does sound "blow the mind of you" and "blow the mind of your friends" taken separately? Wouldn't it be more appropriate to say "blow the mimd of yours" and "blow the mind of your friends'?"
    – Elian
    May 3 '14 at 17:20
  • Double genitive rules are weird / something I don't quite understand but I think that the difference in phrasing shifts the emphasis from friends (in my version) to equal emphasis from both objects (in your version). There's a great exchange: english.stackexchange.com/questions/50588/… And a cool MIT linguistics paper on this distinction: web.mit.edu/alya/www/double-genitives.pdf
    – pavja2
    May 3 '14 at 20:08

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