1

I find issue with the preposition "at."

5
  • It is jargon for the lawyer field. Rules there may not always fit rules in general English.
    – Oldcat
    Commented May 1, 2014 at 18:02
  • The answer to to your question— why the preposition at is used in *at law*— is provided in the answers to the other question. The standard for marking a question as duplicate on Stack Exchange is that the same answer applies, not that the wording of a question is exactly the same.
    – choster
    Commented May 2, 2014 at 19:48
  • "Duplicate" in this context does not mean copied or cheated. It means your question has been asked before and received answers. Your question and Rye bread's fine answer will not be deleted, instead future visitors will see both questions and all the answers posted. Please don't view the "duplicate" closevote as being derogatory, it is stating a fact. If you wish to reopen your question, you need to explain why the duplicate question does not apply. People are open minded here and can be convinced to change their minds, but you need to provide a case.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented May 7, 2014 at 7:12
  • I don't really have the time or patience to care to make a case, honestly. I'm just going to delete my questions and account. This Web site has been more of a frustration and a time-waster than a real help to my knowledge.
    – user67261
    Commented May 7, 2014 at 12:49

1 Answer 1

2

It is part of the historic transgression of their profession. Attorneys go to the courts to speak on their clients behalf. So they are in fact an attorney at law. Law represents the place at which the advocate for their client. It is simply an all encompassing word for any court or "law" ruling center that an attorney may represent their client.

3
  • There are also numerous courts (law, equity, maritime, etc) and historically attorneys were not necessarily authorized to appear at all of them.
    – bib
    Commented May 1, 2014 at 17:29
  • Transgression? I don't like lawyers, but are you sure that is the word you want there?
    – Oldcat
    Commented May 1, 2014 at 18:03
  • @Oldcat - I used it to be ironic. Maybe it doesn't come across well. Commented May 1, 2014 at 21:34