0

I was pretty sure this made sense but then I looked up the dictionary meaning of the word constitute and I wasn't so sure?

By continuing to use the website and/or the Services you constitute that you agree to 
these new terms of use.
3
  • No, it does not. What do you want to say ?
    – user66974
    Commented May 1, 2014 at 9:12
  • @jack Basically by continuing to use the website they agree to the updated terms of use.
    – Brett
    Commented May 1, 2014 at 9:21
  • It's an unusual rewrite of the acceptable: 'Your continuing to use the website and/or the Services constitutes an agreement on your part to these new terms of use.' Commented May 1, 2014 at 10:07

6 Answers 6

1

The use of the word constitute with the sentence conveys the message but somehow seems like a misfit there.

If I have understood it correctly there is an update in the licence terms that you want to notify the user about, before proceeding further.

How about "Continuing the use of this website and/or services indicates that you have read and you agree to the new terms of use."

1
  • 'Constitute' sounds more like it carries the weight of the law than 'indicate'. But then we're into legal fields or grey areas, which are thankfully off-topic. Commented May 1, 2014 at 10:17
1

I'd say that .... you conform to the new terms of use

0

You need to confirm instead of to constitute. "to confirm" is transitive, so you say to confirm something or to confirm + that-clause.

0

Your continued use this website and/or services constitutes your agreement to abide by our new/updated terms of use.

2
  • Are you a mind-reader? Commented May 1, 2014 at 10:07
  • Didn't you just laugh? ;-)
    – Third News
    Commented May 1, 2014 at 10:10
0

In the eight or so decent on-line dictionaries, I haven't found any mention of the availability of a that-clause after the verb 'constitute'.

I've looked for the precise string "constitute that" on the internet, and hardly ever in the first few pages of results is there an example of 'that' being used in its complementiser role. It usually occurs (as far as I have checked) in its determiner role, as part of a noun phrase constituting (oops) the complement of 'constitute' used as a link verb (as is seen by replacement with 'the'):

Truth and reason constitute that intellectual gold that defies destruction.

grant an injunction restraining the person from engaging in conduct that appears to the court to constitute that offence

Vacancies in the council were filled to constitute that body as follows

There is one early usage of the constitute + that-clause:

Just because I live in Iowa, THAT DOESNT CONSTITUTE THAT I LIKE CORN

doesnt it get annoying when you ask your parents, "whats for dinner?" "corn" wow!! your my parents! you KNOW i dont like corn!

But I'd say that this doesn't constitute an authoritative source.

0

Consider simply saying:

By continuing to use the website and/or the services, you agree to these new terms of use.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.