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In this book, the author has introduced many good ways to learn knowledge.

Is it good English to say learn knowledge? Is this a common collocation in English?

  • Could have been earn knowledge -- possible typo. – Kris Apr 29 '14 at 6:44
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    @Kris - 'To earn knowledge' is an expression with little currency in English. – Erik Kowal Oct 13 '14 at 8:50
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No, it's not acceptable to use that construction.

One learns information. Once it's learned, it becomes knowledge.

Knowledge is awareness, consciousness, or familiarity with something gained by experience or learning.

To learn is to acquire knowledge of or skill in by study, instruction, or experience.

  • Thank you very much for this helpful response. Given that "learn knowledge" is not an acceptable construction, could you elaborate on whether "teach knowledge" would be considered unidiomatic as well? Thanks. – user43898 Apr 30 '14 at 6:12
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"In this book, the author has introduced many good ways to learn knowledge." would be more correctly rendered as "In this book, the author has introduced many good ways to acquire knowledge." Alternatively, "In this book, the author has introduced many good ways to learn." would be an expression with the same meaning.

Richard D.

protected by Laurel Nov 5 '18 at 3:48

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