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The same level of detail between the 3D models and the real objects has been achieved.

In formal language, does this sentence make sense? I'm not sure about the use of the preposition "between" in this case.

It should mean that level of detail of the 3d models and level of detail of the real objects is the same.

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(The edit saved this from being merely proofreading.)

Putting the verb phrase has been achieved at the end makes its subject level of detail rather distant. And you're right, it's normally same as, not same between.

How about

The same level of detail has been achieved in 3D models as is present in real objects.

But it's possible to eliminate same as entirely, and still retain the passive voice:

The level of detail present in real objects has been achieved in 3D models.

  • And how would you rephrase this sentence: The results indicate the same level of detail between... (if you wanted "the results" to be a subject?) – Riko Apr 26 '14 at 20:56
  • @Riko The results indicate that the level of detail present in real objects has been achieved in 3D models. – Andrew Leach Apr 26 '14 at 20:58

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