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I'm doing review for a journal. There are many sentences which really confuse me. For example:

We employ similarity learning using Ranking-SVM to learn parameters

Is it better to change it like so?

We employ similarity learning which uses Ranking-SVM to learn parameters

Another sentence

The similarity measure incorporates special emphasis on spatial localization, by which the similarity between x and y decreases with the increase of their in-between distance.

The above sentence is kind of weird to me. Is 'by which' used correctly?

  • Should orismological terms be capitalized? How else would it be distinguishable for a reader without the appropriate technical background? – Third News Apr 26 '14 at 3:49
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    The first sentence has using that is ambiguous -- used by 'similarity learning' or used by 'we'? Using which can remove this ambiguity. – Kris Apr 26 '14 at 4:39
  • Are you translating from another language? Are you a native English speaker? Have you visited English Language Learners? – Kris Apr 26 '14 at 4:39
  • @kris, I don't think the author is a native English speaker – FihopZz Apr 26 '14 at 4:40
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"Which" is a relative pronoun which is used when describing objects. Your revised sentence which includes "which" allows the sentence to flow a bit better in my opinion. Your last question on whether or not the writer implements "by which" correctly is yes, they do. Since it replaces "similarity measure" it is used correctly.

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We employ similarity instruction which uses Ranking-SVM to learn parameters.

The similarity measure incorporates special emphasis on spatial localization, in which the similarity between x and y decreases with the increase of their in-between distance.

We employ similarity learning using Ranking-SVM to teach parameters

or

We employ similarity learning using Ranking-SVM to master parameters

  • Here "similarity learning" is a technical term, and it would not do to replace it by "similarity instruction", nor should you replace learn by teach, just like you wouldn't replace the term "San Andreas fault" by "San Andreas defect". – Peter Shor Apr 26 '14 at 3:24
  • See edit for correction – Third News Apr 26 '14 at 3:33

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