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I am struggling with understanding the difference here:

It will be done at that point in the future.
It will have been done at point in the future.

I know in theory what future perfect tense means but here I cannot see the difference.

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  • easier to understand when you add more information: "We will all die at some point in the future. The world will end at some other point in the future" - "By the time the world ends we will all have died" - both in future but one comes before the other.
    – msam
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 7:59

2 Answers 2

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Let's call that point in the future "tomorrow, 16:00 h".

It will be done at that point in the future.

No-one is doing anything, until tomorrow, 16:00 h. Then what needs to be done, will be done.

It will have been done at point in the future.

At some point in time between now and tomorrow, 16:00 h , what needs to be done will be done. We do not know when exactly it will be done, but will certainly have finished by tomorrow, 16:00 h.

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  • Now that's a perfect explanation, it is clear as daylight. What about 'will be done by tomorrow, 16:00 h'? Is this identical to 'have been done' or is there still some difference? Commented Dec 4, 2021 at 7:49
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The difference is the point of reference, i.e., where you are looking from.

The first refers to the completion point with now as the reference point, i.e., looking from now.

The second refers to the completion point with a reference point after, i.e., looking from after the completion.

For example, today is Monday. The report will be done on Wednesday. It will be done at that point. On Saturday is the party. The report will have been done at that point (from the view of Saturday).

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