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Which sentence is preferred?

The value of A or B is 50% each

The value of A and B are 50% each

The values of A and B are 50% each

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, RyeɃreḁd, tchrist, aedia λ, TimLymington Apr 28 '14 at 12:25

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There is only a single value:

The value of A and B is 50%.

and

The value of A or B is 50%.

The first sentence clearly means that both A and B have the value 50%.

The second sentence is ambiguous and needs additional phrasing to remove the ambiguity.

The value of A or B is 50%, but not both.

The value of at least one of A or B is 50%

I have avoided using each in all cases.

  • you said The first sentence clearly means that both A and B have the value 50%. In fact that is what I meant. A=50% and B=50% – Mahmood Apr 22 '14 at 17:26
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The third one is correct. The first is wrong because you wouldn't use 'each' with 'or'. The second is wrong because A and B are two things, so values needs to be plural.

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"The Values of A and B are 50% each."

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