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If A always defeats B, A is B's nemesis. If B always loses to his rival A, B is A's ____?

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    Biyatch? (Sorry) Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 2:29
  • What they are called depends on your POV but I know I am the infracaninophile
    – Third News
    Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 3:45
  • Who wouldn't save a puppy in traffic? ;-)
    – Third News
    Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 12:30
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    continual annoyance.
    – Jim
    Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 14:17
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    Can you clarify your question? In what way is B not also A's nemesis? So much antagonism. Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 14:52

5 Answers 5

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B is A's punching bag.

B is A's whipping boy.

Stooge.

Sucker.

Schmuck.

Mark.

"Mark" and "punching bag" are the least offensive. "Mark" is the least informal.

http://thesaurus.com/browse/whipping%20boy

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  • I agree with @Beta that "whipping boy" means a proxy for punishment. And "whipping boy" has some nice synonyms for the given situation. And "Tottenham use Fulham as a whipping boy" works. Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 10:43
  • "Punching bag" would be the best fit, I think -- it directly implies that B is incapable of putting up any resistance in a fight. Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 14:25
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I think the best term depends strongly on how the conflict between A and B comes about.

If the weaker B is the instigator of the conflict despite being repeatedly defeated, they might be called a "challenger" or "contender".

On the other hand, if the stronger A is picking on B who is no threat to them, B might be described as "victim", "goat", "whipping-boy" or any number of other more offensive epithets (including, as Earnest Friedman-Hill commented, variations on "bitch").

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    "Whipping boy" means a proxy for punishment, not someone who loses every fight.
    – Beta
    Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 4:24
  • Add perennial, traditional, usual or the like to express an ongoing relationship. Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 4:42
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    I think that current colloquial usage of the term "whipping boy" is a bit broader than the literal people the dictionary definitions describe. It has to do with why A is beating B. If the fight is one-sided and A gives a contrived explanation for instigating the abuse, you could describe B as a "whipping-boy" because the reasoning for the abuse is just as flimsy as the reasons for beating the historic whipping boys for a prince's bad behavior (we generally don't believe in the Divine Right of Kings these days).
    – Blckknght
    Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 4:50
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If A always defeats B, A is B's nemesis. If B always loses to his contender A, B is A's unfortunate rival, or simply "A's rival."

rival: a person or thing that tries to defeat or be more successful than another.

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Different words for different settings:

  • in a team sport: cakewalk

  • on the playground: my bitch

  • funny example: Washington Generals

  • an older phrase that still holds up : patsy

  • gentleman's term: pawn

  • if player A also wins easily and plays around: toy or puppet

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    A pawn sounds more to me like someone that is on your side, but expendable. Similar with toy or puppet, but those are leaning the right way.
    – Cruncher
    Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 13:48
  • @Cruncher - that is one definition. Slang just means someone that you easily control. Doesn't have to be on your side. Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 16:42
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The one not expected to win — usually based on the previous record — is called the underdog.

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