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There are situations when I get in doubt about the usage of a word, even after having used it for long and on a regular basis. One of those words is "foible". I thought it to be related to character or idiosyncrasy or attitude untill I saw it's real definition today in Oxford dictionary. I casually used to say "hey, I don't appreciate such foible" or "I approve of such foible". Now I know that it might have conveyed the meaning to others and seemed appropriate to me but I have been wrong all that time. I need to know if this word matters that much in everyday usage if, the audience were fastidious about proper language and if they were not.

Another question that exhumes out is that whether I should use it as a synonym for weakness or character.

Also, in what way will writing or saying, " I appreciate such foible" be understood? Will the reader or listener think that I like the weakness or flaw in his character or I'm just being sarcastic about it or any other thoughts?

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    Wordnik is often a good place to go to get examples of a word in use. – Jim Apr 20 '14 at 19:41
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    You have assumed it to be a non-count noun (I appreciate such candour) whereas it is actually count (I dislike such habits). It is 'related to character': "A minor weakness or eccentricity in someone’s character: they have to tolerate each other’s little foibles" [ODO] – Edwin Ashworth Apr 20 '14 at 22:13
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Now I know that it might have conveyed the meaning to others and seemed appropriate to me but I have been wrong all that time. I need to know if this word matters that much in everyday usage if, the audience were fastidious about proper language and if they were not.

This depends entirely on the audience. If you use a word incorrectly and they know it is incorrect usage they will most likely (a) politely correct you or (b) politely say nothing. But in either case, a misuse of a word is going to have some negative impact. Namely, you really shouldn't use a word incorrectly. But there is no way for us to accurately answer this question without knowing more about the audience.

Another question that exhumes out is that whether I should use it as a synonym for weakness or character.

The dictionary definition simply says:

foible — a minor weakness or failing of character; slight flaw or defect: "an all-too-human foible."

So, yes. You could use it as a synonym for weakness of character. Whether you should depends on the context. Other synonyms can be found in any decent thesaurus.

Also, in what way will writing or saying, " I appreciate such foible" be understood? Will the reader or listener think that I like the weakness or flaw in his character or I'm just being sarcastic about it or any other thoughts?

It will be understood according to the context in exactly the same way as saying, "I appreciate such [minor weakness or failing of character]." There is a more sympathetic connotation when using "foible" instead of "weakness" so it is less likely to be interpreted sarcastically -- unless, of course, you actually say it sarcastically.

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