0

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context:

Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by Nino.

  • Is Nino the successor to Eighto and the predecessor to Tenno, or do you mean Niño? :) – tchrist Apr 11 '14 at 15:46
5

The correct form is 'the whole of France'. But it is not the only correction one could make to the sentence. It should read:

Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then they were extended to the whole of France by Nino.

4

The sentence is wrong in a few aspects. The subject is Sam, but after the "and" it is no longer Sam, because Sam was not extended, or was he? Consider this as an alternative

Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then they were extended for the whole of France by Nino.

Now the clause after the "and" has a new subject (they = the methods).

With regards to "whole" and "France", it should be "the whole of France".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.