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The process of relational database model design is the method used to create a relational database model. This process is mathematical in nature, but very simple, and is called normalization. With the process of normalization are a number of distinct steps called Normal Forms. Normal Forms are: 1st Normal Form (1NF), 2nd Normal Form (2NF), 3rd Normal Form (3NF), Boyce-Codd Normal Form (BCNF), 4th Normal Form (4NF), 5th Normal Form (5NF), and Domain Key Normal Form (DKNF). That is quite a list.

Obviously it is quite clear what it means (there are a number of distinct steps when it comes to normalization), but I still, with your help, would like to see some other examples that use this type of grammatical construction. The pattern appears to be as the following:

with something is ~

So, will you please show a couple examples with maybe even some explanation along the way?

Much appreciated.

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    You should use within the process of normalization are [blah, blah] if you're determined to have that construction. Though personally I'd rather say the process of normalization consists of a number of steps... – FumbleFingers Apr 11 '14 at 0:56
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Interestingly, when you rephrased your example, you put it in its common form.

there are a number of distinct steps when it comes to normalization...

Usually with x comes y is a more common construction by far.

With Parenthood Comes a Most Spectacular Wake-Up Call. - article title
All the indictors show that with a degree comes clear reduction of unemployment and clear earnings advantage. - Grading America

This is a simple type of inversion.

A Most Spectacular Wake-Up Call Comes With Parenthood.

In fact, I don't think your example quite holds up.

With the process of normalization are a number of distinct steps called Normal Forms. Rearranging that, the sentence becomes

A number of distinct steps called Normal Forms are with the process of normalization.

That is a highly unusual construction, and it doesn't quite make sense to me. It needs another word.

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