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Is dramedy a combination of drama + comedy?

Or, is it a combination for drama + tragedy?

Further research seems to show that it is a combination for drama + comedy.

Question:
In that case, what then would be the portmanteau for drama + tragedy?

  • Technically, it should be neither. It only has the suffix -edy just as comedy and tragedy do, so that neither of them is a part of dramedy. However, the one who coined the term could have meant something anywhere in the range of possibilities. – Kris Apr 9 '14 at 11:02
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    By the way, why the doubt when the dictionaries and even WP have an entry for the word? – Kris Apr 9 '14 at 11:05
  • Kris, my question is "In that case, what then would be the portmanteau for drama + tragedy?" – Blessed Geek Apr 9 '14 at 12:32
  • My point was that lexically, it cannot be the case, hence 'in that case' does not arise. The suffix -edy does not stand for 'comedy'. However, natural language has its quirks. – Kris Apr 10 '14 at 4:32
  • Whatever happened to "tragi-comedy," as in "The whole sordid affair was one big tragi-comedy of errors." Don – rhetorician Mar 4 '15 at 18:31
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'Dramedy' is rather more than simply 'drama + comedy'. It is a dramatic production in which 'the comic elements derive mainly from character and plot development'. (Oxford Dictionaries).

I am not sure if the same concept could exist with 'tragedy', since it is difficult to see how tragedy could be presented other than in the form of a drama.

Whilst there are such things as 'stand-up comics' it is difficult to envisage a 'stand-up tragic'.

  • "Dramatic tragedy," perhaps. – Kris Apr 9 '14 at 11:10
  • The question is "In that case, what then would be the portmanteau for drama + tragedy?" – Blessed Geek Apr 9 '14 at 12:28
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    @BlessedGeek But why would you need such a word? I feel sure, had there been such a general requirement, Shakespeare would have coined one. – WS2 Apr 9 '14 at 14:26
  • Shakespeare also failed to coin "selfie", "socialnetwork", "condom", "transponder" .... – Blessed Geek Apr 9 '14 at 14:35
  • @BlessedGeek Perhaps because none of them had been invented in his day. But dramatic tragedy clearly had. – WS2 Apr 9 '14 at 14:43
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I second medica in that a tragedy already is a drama (being a production with a serious tone or subject), and therefore any portmanteau would be redundant.

However, if you want to make a portmanteau just for fun, but which would be understandable to people (in which case it is not "what would be" but "what could be"), I suggest "dragedy" or "trama".

The latter is probably better as it looks and sounds a little like "trauma".

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