14

As in "the timeslot given to completing the task". Would also be interested to hear if there's different usages for different scenarios.

2
  • Probably the most familiar for your use is in the time allotted. A time slot is a slot in a schedule: ...shows such as Jeopardy! were popular in the time slot. – anongoodnurse Apr 9 '14 at 9:15
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    This is a very clear case where research material is easily obtained and should be shown. – Edwin Ashworth Jul 15 '20 at 14:50
16

According to dictionary.com, it should be two separate words "time slot".

This useful article on compound words offers the following advice:

Many of them are found in the dictionary and are not subject to our interpretation, our judgment, or our whim. Start with your dictionary before applying any other guidelines.

I would be inclined to follow that advice, and use the dictionary version: time slot.

2

It seems that time slot is currently most common, but that doesn’t prevent you from adhering to more (or less) traditional approaches.

Here is the google n-gram of the variants in use since 1940.

Google n-gram of word usage since 1940

And it is always worth browsing at more venerable sources such as The New Yorker’s inimitable Comma Queen, Mary Norris, or, indeed, Wiktionary.

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    You are correct. I believe I’ve been foiled once again by autocorrect. I’ll update it. Thanks. – TransferOrbit Jul 15 '20 at 10:14
0

Both timeslot and time slot are acceptable. You will find an equal amount of dictionaries containing either.

Regarding the hyphenated version, there's been a general trend to move away from hyphenated compound words over the past 40 years. A common, historical pattern is that two words — say, time slot — will be joined by a hyphen for a time — time-slot — and then be joined into one word — timeslot. English is moving away from this and joining languages like German, where words are advantageously and immediately linked to one another.

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    "You will find an equal amount of dictionaries containing either." Is that so? Why don't you name them, so we can see for ourselves how many are in each group, and how reputable they are. – michael.hor257k Oct 26 '18 at 5:39

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