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Which one?

"Why, being only a child, have you come to a place so far away like Greece...?"

Versus...

"Why have you, being only a child, come to a place so far away like Greece...?"

...Or maybe some other phrasing (that is and/or sounds better to you) ?

closed as off-topic by Matt E. Эллен, p.s.w.g, David M, RyeɃreḁd, choster Mar 19 '14 at 17:26

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  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." – Matt E. Эллен, p.s.w.g, David M, RyeɃreḁd, choster
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  • Both are correct, comprehensible and there is almost nothing to choose between them. – WS2 Mar 18 '14 at 21:06
  • Please never just ask “Which is correct?” It shows no effort on your part, and gives us nothing to go on. As the Help Center says in its “How to ask a good question” section: “Have you thoroughly searched for an answer before asking your question? Sharing your research helps everyone. Tell us what you found and why it didn’t meet your needs. This demonstrates that you’ve taken the time to try to help yourself, it saves us from reiterating obvious answers, and above all, it helps you get a more specific and relevant answer!” Thank you. – tchrist Jul 4 '14 at 1:58
2

"Why have you, only a child, come to a place as far away as Greece?" Though honestly, I'd break it up into two sentences: "Why, you're only a child! How have you come to a place as far away as Greece?" It all depends upon the tone you want to express from the speaker, their age, maybe their gender, etc.

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The second sentence sounded better because it required less effort to parse. When I read the first sentence, I almost mistakenly read it with "being" as a noun:

"Why, being of an only child, have you come to a place so far away like Greece...?"

I also agree with omitting "being," as suggested in the answer above, even in both sentences. As in...

"Why, only a child, have you come to a place so far away like Greece...?"

and

"Why have you, only a child, come to a place so far away like Greece...?"

The word "being" is distracting and can be safely removed.

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I prefer the first. I'm not keen on separating the auxiliary verb "have" from the main verb "come" by that many intervening words, as you've done in the second version.

"Why have you, being only a child, come to a place so far away like Greece...?"

I'd also suggest that "so far away as" is preferable to "so far away like".

-1

Why have you, an only child, come to the distant land of Greece?

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