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Clause
Run!
This single-word command is also a clause, even though it does seem to have a subject. With a direct command, it is not necessary to include the subject, since it is obviously the person or people you are talking to: in other words, the clause really reads "[You] run!". You should not usually use direct commands in your essays, except in quotations.

The bold sentence above basically said :

This single-word command is also a clause, despite the fact that it does seem to have a subject.

Doesn't this imply that clause usually doesn't have a subject? Why does it contradict itself?

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    I'd say they screwed up and it was supposed to be "even though it does not seem to have a subject." Mar 17, 2014 at 16:23

1 Answer 1

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The bold sentence in the question basically said :

This single-word command is also a clause, despite the fact that it does seem to have a subject.

So it is concluded that they screwed it up and it was actually supposed to be "even though it does not seem to have a subject."

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