2

As far as I can tell, my question is not a duplicate of either of these two similar questions. It is very close (maybe a duplicate, but I don't quite think so) of this question.

I want to construct a sentence, where there are two things each possessed by one of two people, one of whom is myself. The best I have come up with is something like:

Fred's and my houses are both green.

Two houses, two people (Fred and myself). I'm not sure how to phrase it at all!

I suppose I could go with a longer form like:

Fred's house is green and my house is also green.

But it would be nice if there was a shorter form.

  • 5
    Fred's house and mine are both green. Both Fred's house and mine are green. – StoneyB Mar 7 '14 at 16:00
  • 2
    ... People who live in green houses shouldn't be called Stoney. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 7 '14 at 16:15
  • If you have already introduced Fred, then "Our houses are green" – Oldcat Mar 7 '14 at 23:03
  • See the question about My wife's and my which is very similar to this question. – Andrew Leach Mar 25 '14 at 15:55
  • Depending on what you're trying to emphasize about the coincidence of green house ownership, "Fred's house is green, as is mine" is as short as your first example. – downwitch May 9 '14 at 4:23
1

Fred's house and mine are both green.

0

The houses of Fred and me are green.

OR

Fred and I have green houses.

This is as short as it goes. Unless you want to say:

He and I have green houses.

OR

The green house of mine and the green house of Fred.

But still, this is not really any shorter.

SO

Fred's house and my house are (both) green.

  • 4
    'The house of me' sounds very unnatural, even with Fred as a hedge. Normally, a double possessive structure would be used rather than 'of me': 'That old car of mine'. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 7 '14 at 16:13
  • 1
    @Edwin : But "the houses of Fred's and mine" sounds even more unnatural. (As does "the house of Fred" and "the house of mine".) It should be "Fred's house" and "my house". – Peter Shor Mar 7 '14 at 22:12
  • 1
    Yes – it's crazily idiosyncratic. '... that house of Fred's.' but ??'... the house of Fred's.'. And then again, '... the house of Fred's that had the marvellous verandah.'. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 8 '14 at 9:10
0

Here is are more complete list of double possessive options. Not all of these are as "correct" as the others.

  1. Fred's and John's houses are both green.

  2. Fred and John's houses are both green.

  3. Fred and his houses are both green.

  4. Fred's and his houses are both green.

  5. His and Fred's houses are both green.

  6. Fred and my houses are both green.

  7. Fred's and my houses are both green.

  8. My and Fred's houses are both green.

(1) and (2) are the least contentious and either are completely correct.

Both (4) and (5) sound better to my ear than (3) does. I would slightly prefer (5) overall. I wouldn't say any of these three choices are inherently incorrect.

Both (7) and (8) sound better to my ear than (6) but this time I slightly prefer (7). I would also claim that (6) sounds wrong enough to be completely incorrect.

In any case, this construction does sound awkward and I would encourage reforming the sentence along the lines of DisplayName's second suggestion:

Fred and I have green houses.

I have also heard constructions similar to:

Fred and I, our houses are green.

I am not sure I have ever seen this form written and am unsure of the most appropriate punctuation.

  • (2) "Fred and John's houses are both green" could be interpreted as Fred and John have 2 houses (i.e. co-owned) and they're both green. Similarly (5) and (8). – msam Mar 25 '14 at 16:06
  • @msam: Every single one of these examples could be interpreted that way. (2), (5) and (8) are more likely to be interpreted that way, yes. – MrHen Mar 25 '14 at 16:12
0

Both Fred & I have green houses

  • 2
    But does Fred also have a purple one? – Edwin Ashworth May 3 '14 at 9:59
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Fred and I both have green houses. Fred and me have green houses. Fred has a green house like me. Fred's house is green as is mine. Fred's house is green and mine is too. Fred's house is green just as mine is. The houses of Fred and me are green. Fred just as you do has a green house.

My house is green as is Fred's. My house is green and so is Fred's. My and Fred's house is green. I just as Fred have a green house. Both Fred and I have green houses.= or a house to clarify that the both of you only own one house each.

  • Your use of I in the first paragraph needs some work. – Nathaniel Oct 2 '15 at 1:58

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