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Mary doesn’t play the piano well and nor does Alex.

Mary doesn’t play the piano well. Nor does Alex.

Are they the same? and which one do you use?

.........................................

Now, considering the mentions above, would you please tell me whether these are right or not?

Corpus delicti – other Latin legal term using corpus, here meaning the fact of a crime having been committed, not the body of the person being detained nor (as sometimes inaccurately used) to the body of the victim.

Corpus delicti – other Latin legal term using corpus, here meaning the fact of a crime having been committed, not the body of the person being detained and nor (as sometimes inaccurately used) to the body of the victim.

Corpus delicti – other Latin legal term using corpus, here meaning the fact of a crime having been committed, not the body of the person being detained .nor (as sometimes inaccurately used) to the body of the victim.

...........

In addition, could you possibly explain the following and verb's tense?

having been committed

closed as unclear what you're asking by Bradd Szonye, David M, RyeɃreḁd, anongoodnurse, MetaEd Mar 3 '14 at 16:30

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  • Please post questions separately rather than collecting several questions into one post. – Bradd Szonye Mar 3 '14 at 4:56
2

You don't use "and" and "nor" together because they perform the same function, just as you never use "and" and "or" together (not counting "and/or" which has a different meaning).

The textbook use of nor is as part of a phrase also using the word neither, as in "Neither Mary nor Alex play the piano well." You can think of that phrasing as as expressing the opposite meaning to "Both Mary and Alex play the piano well."

  • 3
    You might also say "Mary doesn't play the piano well, and neither does Alex." – Barmar Mar 2 '14 at 7:37
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Mary doesn't play the piano well and nor does Alex.

The words "and" and "nor" may be used together just fine in this casual context.

As to the matter of verbs, it contains the third person singular present indicative of the transient usage of the verb to play.

Corpus delicti – other Latin legal term using corpus, here meaning the fact of a crime having been committed, not the body of the person being detained nor (as sometimes inaccurately used) to the body of the victim.

This will take some picking apart.

Firstly "other" contextually this only makes sense after a previous mention of such an occurrence of the word corpus, "another" might be preferable, as this contains article an- as a prefix and I venture looks more professional.

Corpus delicti – another Latin legal term using {present continuous} corpus, here meaning {present continuous} the fact of a crime having been committed {past perfect, passive voice}, not the body of the person being detained {present continuous, passive voice}, [use a comma here] nor (as it is {present indicative third person refers to applied} [it + it's better not to omit the verb is, although it can be assumed, if you're studying law, a certain degree of precision will be expected of you.] sometimes inaccurately applied {present simple} [applied scans better]) to the body of the victim.

To type this without marking-up:

Corpus delicti – another Latin legal term using corpus, here meaning the fact of a crime having been committed, not the body of the person being detained, nor (as it is sometimes inaccurately applied) to the body of the victim.

The last part can work equally well I venture without parenthesis:

"not the body of the person being detained, nor as it is sometimes inaccurately applied, to the body of the victim."

  • I'm sorry to downvote, but I believe "and nor" is simply wrong. – Chris Sunami Mar 3 '14 at 15:27
  • I will abide. But my mate doesn't think it's wrong and nor do I. ;) Emphasis and flow of the sentence - it just feels right to me. – Duckisaduckisaduck Mar 4 '14 at 15:44
  • I'm not too good at elaborating, as many native speakers; I know the rules by feel not by rote. (and not by rote?) – Duckisaduckisaduck Mar 8 '14 at 10:47

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