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I am currently working on a technical documentation for data analytics. I am wondering how to say "time span of data" formally, as a section name.

For example, I have temperature data per second and it is from 2012 to 2014. I want to say, "time span of data" is 2 years.

How can I say it formally?

Thanks!

  • A specified length of time within the continuum is an 'interval'. Of course, you will still need to specify which one (1877-8). – Edwin Ashworth Feb 28 '14 at 20:27
  • Thanks you Edwin. Time interval is slightly different from what I want. For example, I have temperature data per second and it is from 2012 to 2014. I want to say, "time span of data" is 2 years and interval is 1 second. – Jiang Xiang Feb 28 '14 at 20:41
  • What's wrong with "Time Span of Data"? It's what I would use. My time is too valuable to tweak my own technical writing like this. Why do you think it's necessary in your case? – Canis Lupus Feb 28 '14 at 21:28
  • The reason why I am tweaking is that I am not a native english speaker and think there might be some better ways of doing it.Thanks. – Jiang Xiang Feb 28 '14 at 21:44
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I have many apps with current data sets and we call that range. We might use interval if it is a common range.

I would say that your data range is (over) two years based on 1 second intervals.

  • A problem with range is that it could be understood as the set of the minimum and maximum values between which all data lie. – Richard Hardy Nov 23 '17 at 8:42
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I think duration is the word you're looking for.

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I think it could be the independant variable?

  • This is not really an answer to this question. The independent variable is not a phrase that means the time span during which data was collected. That would be an input or a cause. See here – David M Feb 28 '14 at 21:49
  • Please do not flag wrong answers as "not an answer". Flag something only when when the normal mechanisms for improving a post (edits, comments, and votes) are inadequate and moderator intervention is necessary. In the case of a wrong answer, consider casting a downvote and leaving a constructive comment. – MetaEd Mar 1 '14 at 15:18

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