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What are the differences in meaning between these sentences?

  1. The weather is hot on the island.
  2. The weather on the island is hot.
  3. On the island, the weather is hot.

Do they mean the weather is usually hot on the island or the weather is hot on the island right now?

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  • The title should say "position of adjective" – JessWelch Feb 23 '14 at 6:54
  • @JessWelch Adjective or subjective complement? – Leon Conrad Feb 23 '14 at 7:22
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    @JessWelch I think OP is moving the adverbial, "on the island". – StoneyB on hiatus Feb 23 '14 at 7:26
  • @StoneyB I see what you mean, you're probably right – JessWelch Feb 23 '14 at 7:33
  • @StoneyB: You are right. Would it be different in meaning if I put 'on the island' at the different positions like the sentences above? Do they mean the weather is usually hot on the island or the weather is hot on the island right now? Thanks. – Apirl Feb 24 '14 at 12:08
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All three of your examples mean the same thing. The most common usage would be (2):

The weather on the island is hot.

You could also say:

It is hot on the island.

The island has hot weather.

If you want to note that the weather is hot at the moment:

The weather on the island is unusually hot.

The weather on the island is abnormally hot.

If you want to note that the weather usually hot:

The weather on the island is traditionally hot.

Or, if you want to say both:

The weather on the island is characteristically hot.

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  • @Apirl: You're welcome! If you feel that this answered your question appropriately, please mark the little checkbox for others who have similar questions. – MrHen Mar 6 '14 at 15:19

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