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Which statements are grammatically correct and which meaning do they convey,

  • This concept helps understand the problem.
  • This concept helps to understand the problem.
  • This concept helps understanding the problem.
  • This concept helps in understanding the problem.

closed as off-topic by choster, Drew, Matt Gutting, ermanen, ScotM Mar 31 '15 at 15:59

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." – choster, Drew, Matt Gutting, ermanen, ScotM
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1

'to help' is a verb that can be used transitively and intransitively.

An example of transitive use would be: A helped B do C.

An example of intransitive use would be: D helped.

Let's look at your examples in this light:

This concept helps understand the problem.
This concept helps to understand the problem.

The sense of both of these is a transitive use of 'helps' (The concept helps [someone] (to) understand the problem), but the object ([someone]) is missing, so the verb appears to be intransitive, which goes against the sense.

This concept helps understanding the problem.
This concept helps in understanding the problem.

The sense of both of these is an intransitive use of 'helps'. Here 'understanding', as a gerund, means 'the act of understanding'. You need the preposition 'in' to convey the relationship grammatically.

Therefore,

'this concept helps in understanding the problem'

is the correct construction to use.

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