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What would be the correct way of saying this:

If you would like to register your interest in...

If you would like to register your interests in...

Both seem to sound correct to me but I was wondering if one was better to use than the other?

  • Several grammatical issues with this. Do you mean an interest in the singular, or in the plural, as in professional and personal interests? – Leon Conrad Feb 18 '14 at 9:38
  • Sorry for being unclear. Basically, I am creating a form for companies to register, so they can attend a meeting to learn more about a particular service. So I want to know if I should say "Please register your interest in the "said meeting"" or if I should your "interests". – Adsy Feb 18 '14 at 9:43
  • @mplungjan Could "interests" be used? – Adsy Feb 18 '14 at 9:52
  • Why would you want them to register their interest in attending, when you seem to be wanting them to RSVP to confirm attendance, or is this an option for people to tell you they're interested in hearing about future meetings...? – Leon Conrad Feb 18 '14 at 11:11
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... register your interest in our service

vs

... register your interests so we can serve you better

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'Register interest' / 'register one's interest' is a set expression, perhaps slightly idiomatic (in that there may be a legal constraint not obvious from the words themselves). To many people, there is a degree of mystery surrounding the expression, especially with regard to its legal ramifications, and 'how / where the registration should be carried out'. 'Interest' here means something more than 'desire to dabble in, perhaps as a hobby'.

But if 'interests' here does mean things like hiking, reading, listening to music, collecting antique adjustable wrenches, use of the word 'register' is unnecessarily confusing. Why not 'let us know about your own particular interests'?

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