3

Let’s say I have many lists of this kind on a page:

  1. Click on the Foo button.
  2. Tick the Bar box.
  3. Click on the Save button.

How should I emphasize Foo, Bar, and Save?

  1. Bold?

    1. Click on the Foo button.
    2. Tick the Bar box.
    3. Click on the Save button.
  2. Italic?

    1. Click on the Foo button.
    2. Tick the Bar box.
    3. Click on the Save button.
  3. Quotes?

    1. Click on the “Foo” button.
    2. Tick the “Bar” box.
    3. Click on the “Save” button.

NOTE: I want the lists to be read as easy as possible.

4
  • 1
    This is really a matter of preference. Most of the UI stuff I've created, especially directions for web applications, use quotes.
    – emsoff
    Feb 17 '14 at 8:38
  • I like to use quotes. Bold is much easier to scan and read. I can’t decide!
    – user557108
    Feb 17 '14 at 8:43
  • "Click on the Foo button." is how it's done conventionally.
    – Kris
    Feb 17 '14 at 11:07
  • You should never use quotes to emphasise something. In this case, though, you're not really emphasising as such—you're quoting literally a string of text that appears on the button/link/menu entry/what-have-you. So quotes work here. Feb 17 '14 at 11:14
3

This is purely a matter of style, which is entirely subjective.

When writing this sort of text, I tend to use bold for button names, but there may be the means to name the actual button itself: foo

Using such styling might be useful if your line spacing is sufficiently wide to accommodate it.

1
  • That looks great on the page, as well.
    – Lambie
    Jun 30 '18 at 15:41
0

"Click on the Foo button." is how it's done conventionally.

0

Here is how I use:

  • Bold: use for sudden contrast, when the emphasis shouldn't be fleeting and need to refer later, or when the emotion is pushed to extreme
  • Italic: use when the word naturally emerge and dissipate into the flow
  • Underline: sentence breakdown, because it can differentiate a segment with multiple words, and multiple segment close together
  • Quote: wording choice, which can be a new term just being coined, or a sarcasm

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.