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What is the word used for a person who makes body casts? Is compounder a good word?

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  • You mean full-body orthopaedic casts? I doubt there is a word that specifically refers to makers of those. A caster would be someone who makes casts in a more general sense, but a body caster sounds very bizarre and would likely not be understood. A compounder sounds like someone who makes compound words to me—I'd never guess it was anything to do with orthopaedic casts. Feb 16, 2014 at 13:19
  • Yes I mean a full-body orthopaedic cast. A caster is fine. Isn't a compounder a guy who fixed bones without surgery?
    – Artemisia
    Feb 16, 2014 at 13:21

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There are two relevant processes in the cast creation:

  1. The creation of the unused materials
  2. The application of the materials in order to form a cast

The people behind step (1) are probably referred to as mixers due to the creation process of plaster of paris:

When the dry plaster powder is mixed with water, it re-forms into gypsum. The setting of unmodified plaster starts about 10 minutes after mixing and is complete in about 45 minutes; but not fully set for 72 hours. If plaster or gypsum is heated above 392°F (200°C), anhydrite is formed, which will also re-form as gypsum if mixed with water.

Apparently, modern casts are often made from other materials but I will let you do futher research on your own.


Step (2) would most likely be performed by a doctor of some sort and is referred to as "setting" the cast:

The setting of unmodified plaster starts about 10 minutes after mixing and is complete in about 45 minutes; however, the cast is not fully dry for 72 hours.

The appropriate term "setter" would exist but it seems unlikely that anyone perform cast settings as their sole occupation.

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I would say that the person is usually called a doctor. A type of doctor that would do this a lot would be an orthopedist.

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