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Are these punctuated satisfactorily with the commas? If not, where else would you put them?

He said that he didn't want to go, and quite frankly he shouldn't have.

We can bill you on our customary terms, or if you'd like we can charge you directly.

We can bill you on our customary terms or, if you'd like, can charge you directly.

  • In the last example, you should either repeat the pronoun or get rid of can. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 16 '14 at 16:58
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He said that he didn't want to go, and, quite frankly, he shouldn't have.

We can bill you on our customary terms or, if you like, charge you directly.

This is what I would write. Not using commas around quite frankly and if you like looks a bit informal.

  • I thought the trend was toward minimal punctuation as long as readability wasn't compromised. – whippoorwill Feb 13 '14 at 0:06
  • I wouldn't necessarily add commas around quite frankly. Doing so implies a pause which is not necessarily there in speech (but can be). If you like, though, is a full clause, and as such requires commas much more strongly. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 16 '14 at 16:56
  • @JanusBahsJacquet: But quite frankly is a disjunct... – Cerberus Feb 16 '14 at 22:50

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