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In the sentence: "The Bayeux Tapestry of 1068 shows designs in colour but not of heraldic form."

Is "heraldic" common between "form" and "colour"? I mean is the adjective "heraldic" joint to both words "form" and "colour"? hence:

"The Bayeux Tapestry of 1068 shows designs in [heraldic] colour but not of heraldic form."

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Feeding your example sentence to Google leads me to think that heraldic definitely does not refer to colour in the way you propose.

Heraldry refers in general to to use of both colour and shape (although colours are often represented by different hashes). On the Bayeux Tapestry, there are coloured shields (literally), but they do not represent the bearers in any heraldic sense of the word. So the sentence should not be read:

The Bayeux Tapestry of 1068 shows designs in [heraldic] colour but not of heraldic form.

But rather:

The Bayeux Tapestry of 1068 shows designs in colour but [the used designs are] not of heraldic form.

Your interpretation of the sentence would have been possible if the preposition of would have been absent, or replaced by in to mimic in colour.

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