5

You can say "to intersect A with B" for "to form the intersection of A and B".

But is there also a verb for "to form the union of A and B"? "to unite A with B" doesn't seem right, at least in the context of set theory.

  • Unite is perfectly correct. – Niall Sep 11 '14 at 9:09
  • Perhaps at Mathematics this question might be better asked. There is a bit of difference in how mathematicians talk than general English. For instance, eschewing the conjugation of the verb, one might say, "And here, we take A union B and ..." – SrJoven Sep 11 '14 at 10:58
  • 1
    The mathematical operation ∪, as well as the act it performs, are both named "union". So, given "operation" in math corresponds to "verb" in grammar (some programming languages go so far as to call their functions "verbs"), I'm tempted to say the verb you want is "to union", as in "Union A with B". – Dan Bron Sep 11 '14 at 11:30
  • @TobiasBrandt, done. – Dan Bron Sep 12 '14 at 16:09
5

The mathematical operator ∪, as well as the act it performs, are both named "union".

So, given "operation" in math corresponds to "verb" in grammar (some programming languages go so far as to call their functions "verbs"), I'm tempted to say the verb you want is "to union", as in "Union A with B".

0

It depends on what you mean by the union. There are several possible ways to join things. They may be

  • interleafed
  • concatenated
  • incorporated
  • merged
  • unified
  • homogenized
  • intermixed
  • coalesced
  • conflated
  • fused
  • mixed
  • commingled
  • blended
  • melded
  • combined
  • conjugated
  • admixed
  • accreted
  • alloyed
  • welded
  • consolidated

and many others.

  • 4
    Many others, including joined. – Andrew Leach Feb 9 '14 at 19:19
  • @AndrewLeach Yes, many, many. – bib Feb 9 '14 at 19:20
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    I specifically mean the union of two sets, as in mathematics. – Tobias Brandt Feb 9 '14 at 20:02
  • 1
    @TobiasBrandt Ask your math teacher. – TylerH Feb 11 '14 at 15:42
0

I wonder if "to unionize" works, it means "to place the members into a Union" - but I've only seen it with Employees / Trade Unions.

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