3

I have had a look at some examples on here, but I am still not sure. Should I hyphenate "up-to-the-minute" in this sentence?

We can supply you with up-to-the-minute intelligence on distributors, companies and geographical locations, allowing you to make an informed decision.

OR

We can supply you with up to the minute intelligence on distributors, companies and geographical locations, allowing you to make an informed decision.

I am leaning toward hyphenating as it is an adjective for intelligence, and also a longer sentence so possibly misread, but I am not sure.

4

Yes. It is not absolutely necessary, but I think this is one of the easier calls with hyphenation; adding clarity in combining the entire adjective into one unit, and matching quite a few dictionaries (most have it either as hyphenated or as both with hyphens predominant among the cited examples).

0

Generally, hyphenate the words of a phrase that modifies a noun.; in your example, "up-to the-minute" is an adjectival phrase that modifies "intelligence."

Note that this hyphenation rule doesn't apply to adverbs within an adjectival phrase, such as "recently received intelligence."

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